Mushroom and pearl barley soup with parmesan – Recipes

1 onion, diced

3 cloves garlic, roughly chopped

150 g pancetta or speck, diced, optional

30 g butter

700 g field mushrooms, thinly sliced

1 cup pearl barley

3 litres vegetable or chicken stock

1 and a half tbsp fresh thyme leaves

1 bay leaf

1 cup cream

sea salt flakes

100 g Parmesan, grated

freshly cracked black pepper

Pumpkin lasagne – Recipes – ABC Radio

Preheat the oven to 190C.

Place the pumpkin on a baking tray, drizzle with oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast for 25 minutes or until the pumpkin is tender. Allow to cool slightly.

Puree pumpkin in a food processor with the chopped sage and nutmeg. Set aside. Clean processor, then process the ricotta, egg, parmesan, salt and pepper.

Lightly grease a 24cm square baking dish. Lay 2 lasagne sheets over the base and spread with half the pumpkin. Add another layer of lasagne sheets, then spread with half the ricotta.

Repeat process, then sprinkle final layer of ricotta with extra parmesan.

Lay a sheet of baking paper over surface, cover with foil and bake for 35 minutes. Uncover and bake for a further 15 minutes or until golden. Stand for 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat the butter, sage leaves and walnuts in a pan for 1-2 minutes over medium heat until the butter starts to foam. Remove from the heat.

Greek cauliflower with a minted maple and tamarind sauce – Recipes

150g panko crumbs

1 clove of crushed garlic

1 tsp. ground ginger

2 tsps. curry powder

1 tsp. ground cumin

2 tsps. ground coriander

1 tsp. black mustard seeds

1 tsp. chilli flakes

2 tsps. caster sugar

Pinch of salt

3 free range eggs, beaten

100g plain flour with a pinch of salt

1 cauliflower, broken in to small florets

Sunflower oil for deep frying

Sauce:

Handful of chopped parsley

Handful of chopped coriander leaves

Handful of chopped mint leaves

1 tbsp. tamarind paste

1 tsp. maple syrup

1 tbsp. olive oil

2 tsps. lime juice

Pinch of salt 2 tbsps. water

Milk poached veal, beets, brassica, avocado – Recipes

Begin by making the beetroot puree, preheat oven to 160 deg C.

Coat beetroots with olive oil, thyme and season with flake salt.

Wrap the beets in aluminium foil and roast for 1 hour until skin peels off and the flesh is tender.

Whilst hot, remove and discard skin, dice into cubes and blend until smooth with vino cotto, olive oil and salt. Reserve.

For the baby beets, repeat process as above. Remove and discard skins. Cut in half lengthwise and set aside.

To poach the veal, bring a saucepan of milk to 55 deg C, add the veal and maintain temperature for 40 minutes. Remove from milk, pat dry and set aside.

Cut the broccolini in half lengthwise.

Cut, peel and segment the avocado into four wedges. Coat the broccolini, avocado with vegetable oil and season with salt.

Char on the grill until coloured and tender. Keep warm and set aside.

To make the beetroot yoghurt sauce, whisk together all of the ingredients, check seasoning and set aside.

To plate the dish, sear the veal on the grill for 3 minutes on both sides until it is cooked medium rare (internal temperature of 54 deg C).

Allow to rest for 5 minutes.

Whilst resting sear the baby beets and collard greens until coloured. Make a splatter of the beetroot sauce, place grilled broccolini, avocado and collard greens. Cut veal in half across the grain and place next to vegetables.

Garnish with fresh collard greens and milk skin.

* Note milk skin is made by whisking milk and salt, bring to 80 deg C, allow skin to form. Gently remove skin and place onto silicone baking sheet and allow to dehydrate at 50 Deg C for at least one hour.

Chocolate Lamingtons – Recipes – ABC Radio

The lamington is an Australian classic – and here, I’ve added a more chocolaty twist. These are so moist and delicious it is difficult to resist going back for seconds.

Flourless chocolate sponge

Preheat the oven to 165C (320F). Grease the inside of a 16 cm (61/4 inch) square cake tin with oil spray before lining the base and sides with baking paper. Using an electric mixer with a whisk attachment, beat the egg yolks and half the sugar on high speed until pale. In a separate clean bowl, whisk the egg whites and cream of tartar on medium-high speed until medium peaks form. Gradually add the remaining caster sugar.

Continue mixing for 1 minute, then remove the whisk attachment.

Sift the cocoa powder and cornflour together. Melt the dark chocolate in a double boiler or in a plastic bowl in the microwave. Fold the sifted ingredients and melted chocolate through the whipped egg yolk mixture with a spatula, then gently fold this mixture into the whisked egg whites. Pour the finished sponge mixture into the prepared tin and bake for 30-35 minutes.

The sponge is ready when you gently press the centre of the cake and it bounces back. Remove from the oven and cool at room temperature before wrapping in plastic wrap and placing in the freezer. (At this stage the sponge can be stored in the freezer for a few weeks prior to using. Ensure that it is well wrapped before freezing.)

Raspberry jam

Put the raspberries, sugar and glucose in a saucepan over medium heat and bring to the boil, stirring. Continue to heat until it reaches a temperature of 103C (217F), or test until you achieve a soft jam consistency. (Placing a small amount on a chilled plate will give you an idea of what the consistency will be like once set.) Remove the jam from the heat, transfer it to a bowl and cover with plastic wrap directly touching the surface of the jam.

Chocolate soaking syrup

Put the sugar, 240 ml (8 fl oz) water, the cocoa powder and raspberry jam in a saucepan over medium heat and stir until the sugar is dissolved. Mix together with a whisk or a hand-held blender until combined. Set aside to cool. (The chocolate soaking syrup can be made up to 4 days in advance and stored in the refrigerator or freezer.)

Coconut coating

Put the desiccated coconut and cocoa powder in a bowl and rub them together by hand to combine.

Assembly

Remove the sponge from the freezer and trim the top with a serrated knife to get a flat surface. While still frozen, cut the sponge into nine equal portions.

Using the handle of a teaspoon, create a hole in the centre of each sponge by removing a small amount of sponge but not going through to the base. Either using a spoon or a piping (icing) bag with a small plain nozzle, place the prepared jam into the hole, filling it to the top.

Dip each filled sponge individually into the prepared chocolate soaking syrup by hand to cover all sides. Transfer immediately to the bowl of coconut coating, and cover all sides of the lamingtons. These lamingtons are best stored at room temperature in an airtight container for up to 2 days.

Chicken, Chorizo and Chick Pea Casserole – Recipes

1.25 kg free-range chicken pieces eg thighs and legs

1/4 cup seasoned plain flour

1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil

1 large onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, crushed or chopped

150g raw chorizo, thickly sliced

1 cup chopped celery

2 medium carrots, peeled and diced

3/4 cup dry white wine eg Riesling, pinot grigio or vermentino

3/4 cup chicken stock

400g can diced tomatoes with juice

1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh thyme or oregano

2 wide strips lemon zest

salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

400g can chick peas, drained and rinsed*

*When in season, use whole peeled and blanched fresh or frozen chestnuts in place of chick peas.

Crispy skinned Salmon, southern gold potatoes, sour cream, lemon, rye croutons and bottarga – Recipes

Season salmon fillet on the skin side and place on a hot Bbq skillet.

Let the skin of the fish slowly crispen up about 5 -6 mins

Once crisp turn over on flesh side for 2 mins.

Take off and Rest for a further 2 mins

Heat potato on the bbq plate. Place in a bowl and season with lemon zest, olive oil lemon juice & salt & pepper

To Plate dish place a good amount of sour cream down first

Place seasoned potato on top

Garnish with crispy rye bread, sliced shallot, julienne of nori & red vein sorrel

Grate Bottarga over potato salad and drizzle with left over dressing from potatoes

Put fish next to salad and serve

Six Simple Steps to Making Stock – Recipes

1. Prep your protein: Making stock is a great way of ensuring that you get every last bit of value from your protein purchases. But of course, it’s important to ensure that your off-cuts and/or leftovers are appropriately ready for action.

Beef, veal or lamb: roast off the bones until golden brown.

Chicken: this can be used raw or cooked (depending on whether you want to make a white or brown stock respectively) chop the chicken into small pieces.

Shellfish: Crush into small pieces and roast off until golden (you can use them raw, but the roasting definitely helps make a sweeter stock)

Fish: If you’re using heads, remove the gills to avoid giving your stock a bitter flavour.

2. 2: 1: 1 : As I’ve mentioned previously, everyone’s got their own golden combo of veg, but the basic non-negotiables are onions, carrots and celery (just quietly, I’ll sometimes even skip the celery if I’ve none to sacrifice). If you start out with 2 parts of onion to 1 part of carrot and/or celery, you’re welcome to add whatever other bits of vegie scraps you have laying about.

3. Forget your seasoning: You’ll be using stocks to enhance the flavour of dishes, so wait until you’ve incorporated the stock into your soup before adding salt and pepper. This is especially critical if you’re planning on making a super-concentrated version, since the longer the liquid reduces, the stronger the salt flavour will become.

4. Give it time: The longer you leave the stock on the heat, the more intense the flavour will become. Setting up the stockpots is often one of the first things on a restaurant’s prep-list, because then they’re assured that another batch of stocky goodness will be ready by the time service comes around.

5. Simmer gently: It can be pretty tempting to crank the heat up and reduce the stock quickly, but you’ll find that this approach leads to a cloudy stock and no depth of flavour. The more vigorously the liquid bubbles, the more chance there is that the gunk at the top will filter down to the bottom and then you’ll never get rid of it. Better to let it form a film at the top that you can skim off right at the end. If you’re making a stock concentrate, expect it to take at least 24 hours – maybe even longer.

6. Cube it: If freezer real estate is at a premium, take the stock concentrate road and reduce it right down until it’s a quarter of its original volume. Skim off any gloop, allow the liquid to cool, pour through a sieve and some muslin cloth (or a clean chux cloth) then pour into an ice-cube tray and freeze. One cube is the equivalent of about 250ml of stock. Think of it as a real flavour saver.

Six Simple Steps to Making Stock – Recipes

1. Prep your protein: Making stock is a great way of ensuring that you get every last bit of value from your protein purchases. But of course, it’s important to ensure that your off-cuts and/or leftovers are appropriately ready for action.

Beef, veal or lamb: roast off the bones until golden brown.

Chicken: this can be used raw or cooked (depending on whether you want to make a white or brown stock respectively) chop the chicken into small pieces.

Shellfish: Crush into small pieces and roast off until golden (you can use them raw, but the roasting definitely helps make a sweeter stock)

Fish: If you’re using heads, remove the gills to avoid giving your stock a bitter flavour.

2. 2: 1: 1 : As I’ve mentioned previously, everyone’s got their own golden combo of veg, but the basic non-negotiables are onions, carrots and celery (just quietly, I’ll sometimes even skip the celery if I’ve none to sacrifice). If you start out with 2 parts of onion to 1 part of carrot and/or celery, you’re welcome to add whatever other bits of vegie scraps you have laying about.

3. Forget your seasoning: You’ll be using stocks to enhance the flavour of dishes, so wait until you’ve incorporated the stock into your soup before adding salt and pepper. This is especially critical if you’re planning on making a super-concentrated version, since the longer the liquid reduces, the stronger the salt flavour will become.

4. Give it time: The longer you leave the stock on the heat, the more intense the flavour will become. Setting up the stockpots is often one of the first things on a restaurant’s prep-list, because then they’re assured that another batch of stocky goodness will be ready by the time service comes around.

5. Simmer gently: It can be pretty tempting to crank the heat up and reduce the stock quickly, but you’ll find that this approach leads to a cloudy stock and no depth of flavour. The more vigorously the liquid bubbles, the more chance there is that the gunk at the top will filter down to the bottom and then you’ll never get rid of it. Better to let it form a film at the top that you can skim off right at the end. If you’re making a stock concentrate, expect it to take at least 24 hours – maybe even longer.

6. Cube it: If freezer real estate is at a premium, take the stock concentrate road and reduce it right down until it’s a quarter of its original volume. Skim off any gloop, allow the liquid to cool, pour through a sieve and some muslin cloth (or a clean chux cloth) then pour into an ice-cube tray and freeze. One cube is the equivalent of about 250ml of stock. Think of it as a real flavour saver.

Wintery roasted root crumble


500g turnip, peeled and cut into bite-sized chunks
500g parsnip, peeled and cut into bite-sized chunks
500g swede, peeled and cut into bite-sized chunks
500g Brussel sprouts, peeled and halved
2 onions, sliced
3 generous tbsp. wholegrain mustard
3 tbsp. honey
4 tbsp. olive oil
1 tbsp. chopped rosemary
1 1/2 cups cream
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
For the topping:
1 good handful porridge oats
4 thick slices stale bread, whizzed to coarse crumbs in a processor or panko crumbs
1 handful toasted walnuts or hazelnuts, roughly chopped
25g unsalted butter, melted
30g strong Cheddar, grated